Contax 90mm f2.8 Carl Zeiss Sonnar T * for G1/2 35mm Primes user reviews : 4.9 out of 5 - 17 reviews - photographyreview.com (2022)

USER REVIEWS

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Showing 1-10 of 17

[Jun 11, 2009]

Ramray

Intermediate

Strength:

Sharp, Crisp
Inexpensive for a Zeiss
Great Bokeh
Small and light

Weakness:

Sometimes the G1 has difficulty locking focus wiht thei lins, but with the G2 it is fine

The best short teles I have ever used were this Planar and the 90/2.8 Leitz. As this is now such a bargan, it is the best overall. Sharp, crisp with color and detail that are just amazing.

Customer Service

Never needed-moot now as no longer in exisitance

Similar Products Used:

Leitz (90), Canon, Nikon, Minolta (100s)

OVERALL
RATING
4

VALUE
RATING
5

[Jan 17, 2004]

Johann B

Expert

Strength:

sharp, great bokeh, inexpensive, professional results, nice color rendition, great contrast

Weakness:

none so far...

It's my favorite portrait lens, bar none. It's sharp where you want it to be, but has lovely bokeh where you don't want it sharp, and has little enough depth of field that you can play with sharpness/bokeh in portraits.

Customer Service

not needed

Similar Products Used:

zeiss 85/1.4, asahi 85/1.8, leitz 90/2 APO

OVERALL
RATING
5

VALUE
RATING
5

[May 05, 2003]

Roberto Walking

Expert

Strength:

high resolution lens. incredibly cheaper than Leitz lens.

Weakness:

No deep of field

Very solid and well made.superlative sharp and resolution.very pleasant the out-focus performance. With G1 it is perfect at 2.8 too!

Similar Products Used:

Nikkor 105 2.5,Planar 85 1.4, Zuiko 100 2.8, Jupiter 9 2, Elmar 90 4

OVERALL
RATING
5

VALUE
RATING
5

[Apr 19, 2002]

Clive Hickman

Intermediate

Strength:

Incredible value for money--the Leica focal length equivalent is inferior according to some tests and it is four times the cost. Very light--I love taking my G2 and 5 lenses on vacation--everything fits in a small Lowepro that weighs so little you can carry the equipment all day without discomfort.

As with all of the Zeiss G lenses, this one is simply excellent. Sharpness is incredible, contrast and color unmatched by anything else I have used including highly rated Nikkors. Skin tones are natural and it is possible to pick out the pores of the skin in portraits taken from 15 feet away and blown up on a 60 by 60 screen. As good as a Hasselblad? Probably. This lens is a gem and the entire G system is a delight--it is THE state of the art for sharpness, contrast, build-quality and convenience.

Customer Service

I hear its good

Similar Products Used:

Nikon 105mm 1.8Nikon 80-200mm

OVERALL
RATING
5

VALUE
RATING
5

[Mar 18, 2002]

Meryl Arbing

Intermediate

Strength:

Incredibly sharp and well built. You can handhold this lens much more easily than and SLR

Weakness:

The shallow DOF takes some experience to account for

An exceptional lens which is completely up to Zeiss standards of quality and manufacture.One must be mindful that when used whide open and a close distances that the lens has a very shallow depth of field and those who are not aware of this may find themselves disappointed but, once you learn to account for this there is usually no more surprises

Customer Service

No fault found!

Similar Products Used:

Zeiss 85/f1.4 SLR

OVERALL
RATING
5

VALUE
RATING
5

[Mar 10, 2002]

lofan

Intermediate

Strength:

Sharp, good color rendering, can handle poirtrait but will take your time

Weakness:

don''t expect to shoot macro flowers, I have tried too many times already

I must say this lens *was* really hard to handle.It''s sharp, it''s small and light weight as a 90 F2.8, the outcoming color is good, and the out-focus area looks sweet while the in-focus area looks popping out, it is a very nice lens, but that''s what after you can handle its focusing mechanism.Honestly speaking, I owned it for more than half a year, up to now I still cannot say I can handle the AF very well. Now I don''t have much difficulty focusing a person (she''d be within the sharp range, but I cannot make a crystal sharp right at the eye), but I really cannot handle tele-macro flowers! I think 7 macro flowers out of 10 will turn out to be failed works in my memo bin (I like using failed pictures as memos at home and even at work!)Anyway, so the final conclusion is you will need to have more practice before you can really love this lens. If you fail to master it, you will not like it.I rated it at 4 stars only because of the difficulty in focusing, the optical peroformance will be absolutely a 5 star one.

Customer Service

None needed

Similar Products Used:

Nikon 85 F1.8D, initially I thought this Nikon was sharp and was one of the best on earth, but after using this Contax, I found the quality of the Nikon one to be a very normal one ^_^

OVERALL
RATING
4

VALUE
RATING
5

[Feb 28, 2002]

jason4774

Intermediate

Strength:

Very sharpVery contrastyWonderful colorsExcellent wide openalmost no distortiongreat bokehcheap for the quality of results

Weakness:

difficult to accurately focus (but not impossible)noisy (all the G series lenses are)lens hood is enormous (too big to leave on the camera at all times)

this is the sharpest telephoto lens I have ever used!At every f-stop, the sharpness and contrast are exceptional, and the colors are some of the best I have ever seen! In portraits, you can make out the fine texture of skin, to every little fine hair (which is either a blessing or curse...for me, it is a blessing)Attached to the G1, there is no mirror vibration, so I can get pin sharp 8x10 photos down to 1/20th of a second, and 4x6 photos at 1/10th.In theory. In practice...Since the lens is not rangefinder coupled, it has a steep learning curve before you know what you are focusing on. This makes wide open shooting difficult. contaxg.com has alot of useful information on how to properly focus specific lenses for this system at different distances, but still, it takes a while to get the hang of it, and even now, I''''m never 100% positive that I am focusing on the right part of the subject.Still, it produces the best photos I have gotten out of a telephoto lens. The out of focus areas are creamy smooth, and the focused subjects seem to come off the print (a feat no Canon lens I have ever used can duplicate)If you don''''t mind burning a couple of rolls of film learning how to use it, it''''s a wonderful tool to own.My advise to potential buyers.Go to a camera store. Purchase a roll of high speed film from them, and ask to try out the lens right there in the store. Shoot anything. The salesmen, some advervisements on the counter, the customers, anything, and try to shoot most of the shots wide open or at f4. Then hand the salesman the roll of film to develop. Once you get the results back from this experiment, you''''ll be able to see, in practice, if the lens works for you or not.In theory, this lens is everything I could wish for. In practice, it has taken some time to learn how wonderful it really is.

Customer Service

never used, can''''t say

Similar Products Used:

canon usm 100 2.0contax 135mm 2.8canon usm 200 2.8contax g 35 2.0contax 50mm 1.4

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5

[Aug 22, 2000]

Erik Lukas

Intermediate

Strength:

One of the best medium length portrait lenses. Very solidly built, and perfectly balanced when mounted on the G2.

Weakness:

None.

I would love to see Contax release a 105mm or 135mm telephoto for the G line. 90mm works fine, but sometimes leaves a little to be desired. However, since they do not have a 105 or 135, and they do have a 90mm, I will say that this 90mm has never disappointed me. It can be a little tough to get tack sharp focus at f/2.8 at very close subject to lense distances, but when lighting permits a stop down to f/4 will always render sharp focus. This lense produces the best bokeh of any lense I have ever used including Nikon's superb 135mm focus control lense. I have shot portraits with this lense that produce prints of up to 11X14 that cannot be distinguished from those shot with medium format 210mm lenses. Once you get into 16X20 prints, the only factor that works against this lense is the ability of the lab technician to make a great print, and the enlarging lense being used on that print. This lense is fantastic!

Customer Service

None needed.

Similar Products Used:

Nikon 85 and 105mm. Mamiya 210mm f/4

OVERALL
RATING
5

VALUE
RATING
5

[Aug 08, 2000]

Chris

Intermediate

Strength:

A high-performance portrait lens. Incredible sharpness, contrast, & color rendition (although I shoot mostly black & white). Good bokeh. Also very well-constructed.

Weakness:

None.

One of the best 90mm lenses available in the 35mm format. Another optical jewel in the Carl Zeiss crown.

Customer Service

None needed.

Similar Products Used:

Other G-series (21, 28, & 45). Old Contax RF lenses. Various Contax SLR, Nikon, & Leica.

OVERALL
RATING
5

VALUE
RATING
5

[Jan 04, 2000]

Kunuk

Expert

Model Reviewed:90mm f2.8 Carl Zeiss Sonnar T * for G1/2

Strength:

Extremely fine quality!

Weakness:

No!

The best quality optics for "Mediumformat" shots, but with 35mm size films. Not suitable for portraits, - if you want to keep your motives friendly. Razorsharp!

Customer Service

Haven't been nessesary.

Similar Products Used:

Nikkor 1,4/85+2,8/135, Tamron 2,5/90, Contax SLR 2,8/85+135mm

OVERALL
RATING
5

VALUE
RATING
5

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Showing 1-10 of 17

FAQs

Does Contax G1 have flash? ›

The Contax G1 camera does not come with a built in flash. However, Contax produced a flash to be used with the camera: the TLA Flash System.

When did the Contax G1 come out? ›

The Contax G1 was released in 1994, and the G2 in 1996. These were marketed as premium cameras, with the G1 and 45mm combo costing the equivalent of almost $4000 USD in today's dollars.

When was the Contax G2 made? ›

The G2 was released in 1996 alongside the 21 mm f/2.8 Biogon and 35 mm f/2 Planar. The 35–70 mm f/3.5–5.6 Vario-Sonnar, the first zoom lens for a rangefinder camera, was the last lens to be released, in 2000.

What mount is Contax G1? ›

The new camera, the Contax G1, used the "G"-mount, an electronic autofocus mount.

Is the Contax G1 worth it? ›

Final verdict on the Contax G1

The way that the Contax G1 handles is really good thanks to the small and solid build. The lenses are absolutely brilliant and render beautiful images. The Contax G series cameras are worth getting for the lenses alone.

Are Contax good cameras? ›

Contax cameras were some of the best 35mm in the world since the 1930s. Thanks to the emphasis on the lens quality. Zeiss lenses and excellent materials made the Contax T line a huge success. Compact, and built with quality in mind, many photographers love the Contax.

Is Contax G2 better than G1? ›

As a whole, the Contax G1 and Contax G2 35mm rangefinder-style film cameras are very similar. The key differences between the two cameras are the G2 has the superior autofocus system and button layout, it is slightly larger and heavier, came in more finishes, and has more lens options than the original G1.

Does the Contax G1 have autofocus? ›

Today's photographers are mostly used to the laser-sharp, lightning-fast autofocus features offered by modern digital cameras. The Contax G1 offers a reliable autofocus that still requires you to slow down and consider each shot before fully pressing the shutter button.

Is Contax G1 a point and shoot? ›

The Contax G1 is the best point & shoot camera! Okay, so technically it's not a point & shoot per se, it's more like a rangefinder camera. Though, even then it's not your typical rangefinder camera like the Leica M6.

What camera does Zendaya use? ›

Contax G2. One of Zendaya's film cameras is the Contax G2. Known as one of the most advanced rangefinders, meant to go up against Leica M6s – the Contax G2 brings high-tech focusing, metering, and an assortment of great lenses to the Contax line. Ergonomically, the Contax G2 is designed with form following function.

Why is the Contax G2 so popular? ›

Reasons to Love the Contax G2

It was manufactured between 1996 and 2005 and is the sequel to the Contax G1 camera. It's a compact, lightweight camera system designed to be extremely easy to use and reliably accurate in auto mode, yet with the option of full manual control.

Does the Contax G2 have a built in flash? ›

Contax G series cameras do not come with a built in flash. However, they use the TLA Flash System, which uses direct light metering to automatically control the amount of light used through the use of a mountable flash that attaches to the hot shoe on the top of the camera.

Can you use G1 lenses on a G2? ›

The G2 can use the newest 21mm f/2.8 and 35mm f/2 lenses, while the G1 needs to be modified to take these. Only the G2 can use the 35-70mm zoom. The G2 has a dedicated wheel to set the film advance mode, compared to a button on the G1.

What is Contax Green Label? ›

This made no difference for the primes I have, but green label means it has been modified to work with more lenses (21 mm and 35 mm lenses for instance). G1s and the 35-70mm zoom are not compatible green label or not.

What is a rangefinder film camera? ›

A rangefinder camera is a camera fitted with a rangefinder, typically a split-image rangefinder: a range-finding focusing mechanism allowing the photographer to measure the subject distance and take photographs that are in sharp focus.

Why is the Contax T2 so good? ›

A camera for serious compact photographers looking for the maximum image quality from their compact camera. The Contax T2 feels well built and offers aperture priority, auto mode, autofocus and all the other mod cons.

Which camera does Kendall Jenner use? ›

Instax Wide 300 – Kendall Jenner's Polaroid Camera

This camera sports easy-to-use functions like automatic flash that adjusts to several conditions, and even automatic exposure compensation. The camera literally has 3 buttons and is meant to be turned on, used, and capture moments in an instant.

What camera does Gigi Hadid use? ›

Late last year, fashion's golden girl Gigi Hadid started a second Instagram account dedicated to film photos. Frank Ocean documented the 2019 Met Gala with a Contax T3 35mm film camera.

Does Contax G2 have manual focus? ›

The Contax G2 is like no other rangefinder on Earth. In fact, its technological ethos employs certain tricks that are outright heresy to diehard fans of the classic rangefinder; it runs on batteries, its manual focus mode is terrible, and its viewfinder lacks frame lines and a focusing patch.

How do you use a Contax TV? ›

Contax TVS Film Camera Review - YouTube

What is a Contax camera? ›

Contax is originally the name of the famed 35mm rangefinder camera made from 1932 by Zeiss Ikon (see Contax rangefinder), which subsequently became the name of a pioneering single-lens reflex camera made from 1947 by the Eastern part of Zeiss Ikon (see Contax S).

How much is a Contax G1? ›

$300 - $500 gets you a G1 body and a 45mm f/2 lens. $700 - 800 gets you a G2 and 45mm lens. You'll often see a G2 body offered with a complete set of 28mm, 45mm and 90mm lenses and the TLA200 flash. Expect to pay between $800 - $1,300 for the whole load.

What is G1 lens? ›

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1 is the first camera to employ a Micro Four Thirds lens mount. This is compatible with any Micro Four Thirds lens, and can also accommodate any full-sized Four Thirds lenses with the optional DMW-MA1 adapter, albeit with possible AF restrictions we'll describe below.

What is Contax Green Label? ›

This made no difference for the primes I have, but green label means it has been modified to work with more lenses (21 mm and 35 mm lenses for instance). G1s and the 35-70mm zoom are not compatible green label or not.

Can Lumix G1 record video? ›

You can record to the capacity of the card. There's a stereo mic on top of the camera. Bolstering the video capability is a revamped version of Panasonic's Venus Engine image processor, the Venus Engine HD, with dual processors to handle the extra data load.

Is Panasonic camera DSLR? ›

Panasonic produces a range of cameras under its Lumix brand, from point-and-shoots to DSLRs and mirrorless cameras. The company is known for standardizing and developing the Micro Four Thirds (MFT) system of cameras and lenses in collaboration with Olympus.

What was the first mirrorless camera? ›

2008. The first mirrorless camera commercially marketed was the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1, released in Japan in October 2008. It was also the first camera of Micro Four Thirds system, developed exclusively for the mirrorless ILC system.

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